Title

Consumer Decision-Making, Perceived Product Value, and Purchasing Behavior in the Taipei Digital Camera Market

Date of Degree

2004

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program

Education

Advisor

Nancy Robbins

Advisor

Annette E. Craven

Advisor

Joseph W. Eyles

Advisor

David G. Vequist

Abstract

This study examined consumers’ decision-making styles by using the Consumer Styles Inventory (CSI) by Sui, Hui, Wang, and Chang (2001). It also investigated the relationship between the decision-making styles and the Perceived Value (PV) (Teas & Agarwal, 2001) when purchasing digital cameras and related equipments. The Independent Sample t test and Multiple Regression was used in analyzing the data. The results of the study indicated that Taiwanese consumers were most identified as price-value consciousness, perfectionism, and confused by over choice decision-making styles. In addition, the consumers may have two or more than two decision-making styles at the same time. The consumers with price-value consciousness decision-making styles had a positive relationship with perceived product quality and had a negative relationship with perceived product value and perceived performance risk. The consumers with perfectionism decision-making styles had a negative relationship with perceived sacrifice and perceived financial risk. The consumers with confused by over choice decision-making styles had a positive relationship with perceived product quality, and had a negative relationship with perceived product value and perceived product performance risk. Marketing managers could use this information to target consumers which had certain traits in these decision-making styles. In addition, future researchers could continue this research by adapting it to general shopping orientation or other similar high technology product.

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