Title

Decentralization and Organizational Climate: Assessing the Relationship in a Law Enforcement Setting

Date of Degree

8-2008

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program

Education

Advisor

Richard Henderson

Advisor

Absael Antelo

Advisor

Roger Barnes

Advisor

Nancy Robbins

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between organizational climate as a dependent variable and decentralization as an independent variable. Further, this study was designed to determine whether perception of climate differences existed among different demographic groups within the organization. When aggregated or measured collectively, perceptions from individual employees are believed to reflect the group-level attribute known as organizational climate (James, Joyce, & Slocum, 1988). These perceptions can affect the performance and motivation of organizational employees (Hoy, 1986). Przestrzelski (1987) offers a general definition of decentralization as a "dynamic participative philosophy of organizational management that involves selective delegation of authority to the operational level." Evaluation of correlation calculations indicated that relationships among the 2 Hage & Aiken independent variables of decentralization (participation in decision making, and hierarchy of authority), with the 7 dependent variables of the Organizational Health Inventory that determine overall climate showed no statistically significant correlations. Further, this study found that there were no significant differences in how both demographic groups perceived organizational climate.

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